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Historic Photos

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Group 514, Ohio Wing-Cleveland Municipal Airport, c. Nov 1942. Source: CAP National Archives
Group 514, Ohio Wing-Cleveland Municipal Airport, c. Nov 1942. Source: CAP National Archives
Privates Charlie Shelton and Edward Prather, CAP 22nd Tow Target Unit, Hyde Field, Clinton, Md., 1944. Source: CAP National Archives
Privates Charlie Shelton and Edward Prather, CAP 22nd Tow Target Unit, Hyde Field, Clinton, Md., 1944. Source: CAP National Archives
Southern Liaison Patrol Unit No. 2, Biggs Air Force Base, El Paso, Texas, 11 Jan 1943, pass and review during change of command. Source: CAP National Archives
Southern Liaison Patrol Unit No. 2, Biggs Air Force Base, El Paso, Texas, 11 Jan 1943, pass and review during change of command. Source: CAP National Archives
Women in the Colorado Wing CAP in 1943. On a visit to the CAP-2nd Air Force Courier Station at Peterson Army Airfield in 1943, these were part of the contingent present. L to R: SM Ann Frink, SM Dorothy Young, Unknown, Unknown, 1st Lt. Rosemary Regan, Unknown, SM Marcile Young. Source: CAP National Archives
Women in the Colorado Wing CAP in 1943. On a visit to the CAP-2nd Air Force Courier Station at Peterson Army Airfield in 1943, these were part of the contingent present. L to R: SM Ann Frink, SM Dorothy Young, Unknown, Unknown, 1st Lt. Rosemary Regan, Unknown, SM Marcile Young. Source: CAP National Archives
Pilot-Plane Lineup for Inspection, 2nd AF Courier Service. 2nd Air Force - CAP Courier Service operations at Peterson Army Air Field became the central hub of a 17-state network of flights that originated here when headquarters, 2nd Air Force, was moved to Colorado Springs. Source: CAP National Archives
Pilot-Plane Lineup for Inspection, 2nd AF Courier Service. 2nd Air Force - CAP Courier Service operations at Peterson Army Air Field became the central hub of a 17-state network of flights that originated here when headquarters, 2nd Air Force, was moved to Colorado Springs. Source: CAP National Archives
Southern Liaison Patrol Unit 1 - Fort McIntosh, Laredo, Texas. The flight line at Fort McIntosh. Source: CAP National Archives
Southern Liaison Patrol Unit 1 - Fort McIntosh, Laredo, Texas. The flight line at Fort McIntosh. Source: CAP National Archives
Maintenance crews at work at the hangar for Coastal Patrol Base No. 20, Bar Harbor, Maine, June 1943. Source: U.S. Office of War Information, Library of Congress
Maintenance crews at work at the hangar for Coastal Patrol Base No. 20, Bar Harbor, Maine, June 1943. Source: U.S. Office of War Information, Library of Congress
Stinson Voyager 10 prepping for takeoff, Coastal Patrol Base No. 20, Bar Harbor, Maine, June 1943. Source: U.S. Office of War Information, Library of Congress
Stinson Voyager 10 prepping for takeoff, Coastal Patrol Base No. 20, Bar Harbor, Maine, June 1943. Source: U.S. Office of War Information, Library of Congress
Willa Beatrice Brown, 31, serves her country by training pilots for the U.S. Army Air Forces. She was the first African-American woman to receive a commission as a lieutenant in the U.S. Civil Air Patrol. Source: U.S. Office of War Information, National Archives
Willa Beatrice Brown, 31, serves her country by training pilots for the U.S. Army Air Forces. She was the first African-American woman to receive a commission as a lieutenant in the U.S. Civil Air Patrol. Source: U.S. Office of War Information, National Archives
L to R, Sgt. Edsel B. RivenBark, Sgt. Bill G. Haire, Sgt. Tyler B. Dunlap Jr., Sgt. Carl E. Lucas, Lt. Charles W. Fields and Capt. Edwin T. Howard enjoy a moment at Tow Target Unit No. 21, Monogram Field, Driver, Va., 1944. Source: North Carolina Archives, Raleigh, N.C.
L to R, Sgt. Edsel B. RivenBark, Sgt. Bill G. Haire, Sgt. Tyler B. Dunlap Jr., Sgt. Carl E. Lucas, Lt. Charles W. Fields and Capt. Edwin T. Howard enjoy a moment at Tow Target Unit No. 21, Monogram Field, Driver, Va., 1944. Source: North Carolina Archives, Raleigh, N.C.
Maj. Earle L. Johnson, left, CAP National Commander, and Mr. Gill Robb Wilson, right, discuss policy matters at Civil Air Patrol National Headquarters, c. 1942. Source: Jill D. Paulson
Maj. Earle L. Johnson, left, CAP National Commander, and Mr. Gill Robb Wilson, right, discuss policy matters at Civil Air Patrol National Headquarters, c. 1942. Source: Jill D. Paulson
Lt. Col. Frank E. Dawson, right, commander of the North Carolina Wing, Coastal Patrol Base No. 21, Beaufort, N.C., and Tow Target Unit No. 21, Monogram Field, Va., converses with a CAP lieutenant, c. 1944-45. Source: Charles Small Family, Richmond, VA.
Lt. Col. Frank E. Dawson, right, commander of the North Carolina Wing, Coastal Patrol Base No. 21, Beaufort, N.C., and Tow Target Unit No. 21, Monogram Field, Va., converses with a CAP lieutenant, c. 1944-45. Source: Charles Small Family, Richmond, VA.
Civil Air Patrol cadets, Grenier, Mass., c. 1942-1943. Source: CAP National Headquarters
Civil Air Patrol cadets, Grenier, Mass., c. 1942-1943. Source: CAP National Headquarters
On Feb. 17, 1943, President Franklin D. Roosevelt presented the Air Medal to Maj. Hugh R. Sharp (center), Lt. Edmond Edwards, USN (R), for their heroic rescue of Lt. Henry Cross, at Coastal Patrol Base No. 2, Rehobeth Beach, Del., on July 21, 1942, in the Oval Office. Source: CAP National Headquarters
On Feb. 17, 1943, President Franklin D. Roosevelt presented the Air Medal to Maj. Hugh R. Sharp (center), Lt. Edmond Edwards, USN (R), for their heroic rescue of Lt. Henry Cross, at Coastal Patrol Base No. 2, Rehobeth Beach, Del., on July 21, 1942, in the Oval Office. Source: CAP National Headquarters
Lts. Addis A. Alston (L) and Paul J. Little (R) hold a practice bomb at Coastal Patrol Base No. 16, Manteo, N.C., which is inscribed “To Adolf’s Subs,” c. 1942. Source: Dare County Regional Airport, Manteo, N.C.
Lts. Addis A. Alston (L) and Paul J. Little (R) hold a practice bomb at Coastal Patrol Base No. 16, Manteo, N.C., which is inscribed “To Adolf’s Subs,” c. 1942. Source: Dare County Regional Airport, Manteo, N.C.
Stinson Voyagers from Coastal Patrol Base No. 3 on an early morning patrol over the Atlantic Ocean between Palm Beach and Cape Canaveral, 1942-1943. Source: Historical Society of Palm Beach County
Stinson Voyagers from Coastal Patrol Base No. 3 on an early morning patrol over the Atlantic Ocean between Palm Beach and Cape Canaveral, 1942-1943. Source: Historical Society of Palm Beach County
CAP cadets signing up for USAAF aviation cadet training, c. 1943-44. Source: CAP National Headquarters
CAP cadets signing up for USAAF aviation cadet training, c. 1943-44. Source: CAP National Headquarters
CAP members at Tow Target Unit No. 21, Monogram Field, Va. The aircraft bears the insignia of Coastal Patrol Base No. 17, Riverhead, Long Island, N.Y. Source: North Carolina Archives, Raleigh, N.C.
CAP members at Tow Target Unit No. 21, Monogram Field, Va. The aircraft bears the insignia of Coastal Patrol Base No. 17, Riverhead, Long Island, N.Y. Source: North Carolina Archives, Raleigh, N.C.
An assembly of various CAP aircraft at Lansing, Mich., in 1942. Source: CAP National Headquarters
An assembly of various CAP aircraft at Lansing, Mich., in 1942. Source: CAP National Headquarters
Female members practice emergency medical training during a field exercise. Source: CAP National Headquarters
Female members practice emergency medical training during a field exercise. Source: CAP National Headquarters
A Stinson 10A Voyager owned by Bruce P. Ellen of Coastal Patrol Base No. 21, Beaufort, N.C., is pictured here painted in a U.S. Navy camouflage paint scheme to minimize visual detection by German U-boats. It is also armed, in this case with a U.S. Navy Mk 15 practice bombs. This plane crashed on takeoff on Feb. 19, 1943, but the crew escaped unharmed. Source: Charles Small Family, Richmond, Va.
A Stinson 10A Voyager owned by Bruce P. Ellen of Coastal Patrol Base No. 21, Beaufort, N.C., is pictured here painted in a U.S. Navy camouflage paint scheme to minimize visual detection by German U-boats. It is also armed, in this case with a U.S. Navy Mk 15 practice bombs. This plane crashed on takeoff on Feb. 19, 1943, but the crew escaped unharmed. Source: Charles Small Family, Richmond, Va.
Jean Dillman (L) and Iris Smith (Ross) (R) wearing the first approved CAP women’s uniforms in early 1942 in Central Ohio, Norton Field, Columbus. Source: Donald W. Ross Jr.
Jean Dillman (L) and Iris Smith (Ross) (R) wearing the first approved CAP women’s uniforms in early 1942 in Central Ohio, Norton Field, Columbus. Source: Donald W. Ross Jr.
Col. Earle L. Johnson, the Civil Air Patrol’s wartime commander beginning in March 1942 for the duration. Source: Florida Wing, Civil Air Patrol
Col. Earle L. Johnson, the Civil Air Patrol’s wartime commander beginning in March 1942 for the duration. Source: Florida Wing, Civil Air Patrol
The iconic 1943 recruitment poster of the CAP in World War II was designed by V. Clayton Kenney of Cleveland, Ohio, himself a member of squadron 511-3, Chagrin Falls, Ohio. Source: U.S. Office of War Information, National Archives
The iconic 1943 recruitment poster of the CAP in World War II was designed by V. Clayton Kenney of Cleveland, Ohio, himself a member of squadron 511-3, Chagrin Falls, Ohio. Source: U.S. Office of War Information, National Archives
CAP aircraft often dropped leaflets over American cities to inform the public about homeland defense measures. This leaflet from June 1942 was one of 500,000 dropped by members of Squadron 5111-1 of Cincinnati, Ohio, to help promote the War Savings Bomb pledge campaign. Source: Charles R. Heath II.
CAP aircraft often dropped leaflets over American cities to inform the public about homeland defense measures. This leaflet from June 1942 was one of 500,000 dropped by members of Squadron 5111-1 of Cincinnati, Ohio, to help promote the War Savings Bomb pledge campaign. Source: Charles R. Heath II.
Members of Civil Air Patrol Courier Station 51-2, Cincinnati, Ohio, Summer 1943. Source: Charles R. Heath II.
Members of Civil Air Patrol Courier Station 51-2, Cincinnati, Ohio, Summer 1943. Source: Charles R. Heath II.
A patrol aircraft out of Coastal Patrol Base No. 3, Lantana, Fla., flying north off the east coast of Florida between Palm Beach and Melbourne, c. 1942-1943. Source: Historical Society of Palm Beach County
A patrol aircraft out of Coastal Patrol Base No. 3, Lantana, Fla., flying north off the east coast of Florida between Palm Beach and Melbourne, c. 1942-1943. Source: Historical Society of Palm Beach County
CAP aircrews from Coastal Patrol Base No. 3 walking the line of Stinson Voyagers at Lantana Airport, Fla., c. 1942-1943. Source: Historical Society of Palm Beach County
CAP aircrews from Coastal Patrol Base No. 3 walking the line of Stinson Voyagers at Lantana Airport, Fla., c. 1942-1943. Source: Historical Society of Palm Beach County
An aircraft from the CAP Southern Liaison Patrol scans the U.S.-Mexican border for any signs of suspicious activity, c. 1943-1944. Source: CAP National Headquarters
An aircraft from the CAP Southern Liaison Patrol scans the U.S.-Mexican border for any signs of suspicious activity, c. 1943-1944. Source: CAP National Headquarters
Members of Coastal Patrol Base No. 17, Riverhead, Long Island, N.Y., drilling by the base hangar, c. 1942-1943. Source: CAP National Headquarters
Members of Coastal Patrol Base No. 17, Riverhead, Long Island, N.Y., drilling by the base hangar, c. 1942-1943. Source: CAP National Headquarters
Members of Tow Target Unit No. 22, Hyde Field, Clinton, Md., display a target especially enticing for aspiring American gunners. Source: CAP National Headquarters
Members of Tow Target Unit No. 22, Hyde Field, Clinton, Md., display a target especially enticing for aspiring American gunners. Source: CAP National Headquarters
An aircraft from Tow Target Unit No. 22, Hyde Field, Clinton, Md., with a target sleeve deployed, c. 1944. The sleeve would be extended out via an electric winch as a target on which USAF fighter pilots or Army antiaircraft gunners could practice their marksmanship. Source: CAP National Headquarters
An aircraft from Tow Target Unit No. 22, Hyde Field, Clinton, Md., with a target sleeve deployed, c. 1944. The sleeve would be extended out via an electric winch as a target on which USAF fighter pilots or Army antiaircraft gunners could practice their marksmanship. Source: CAP National Headquarters
This aircraft at Coastal Patrol Base No. 1, Atlantic City, N.J., belonging to Maj. Wynant Farr, is equipped as follows: a 250-pound bomb under the belly, eight flares or smoke bombs, a Grimes signal light, a box of lenses for the light, six round sea markers, two life rafts, and two Mae West life preservers. The chevrons on the aircraft each represent 100 hours of patrol flight time. Source: CAP National Archives
This aircraft at Coastal Patrol Base No. 1, Atlantic City, N.J., belonging to Maj. Wynant Farr, is equipped as follows: a 250-pound bomb under the belly, eight flares or smoke bombs, a Grimes signal light, a box of lenses for the light, six round sea markers, two life rafts, and two Mae West life preservers. The chevrons on the aircraft each represent 100 hours of patrol flight time. Source: CAP National Archives
Citation for the Air Medal presented posthumously to the widow of Lt. Julian L. Cooper of Nashville, N.C., who died of exposure after his aircraft from Coastal Patrol Base No. 16, Manteo, N.C., crashed at sea on Dec. 21, 1942. He forever remains on external coastal patrol. Source: Dare County Regional Airport, Manteo, N.C.
Citation for the Air Medal presented posthumously to the widow of Lt. Julian L. Cooper of Nashville, N.C., who died of exposure after his aircraft from Coastal Patrol Base No. 16, Manteo, N.C., crashed at sea on Dec. 21, 1942. He forever remains on external coastal patrol. Source: Dare County Regional Airport, Manteo, N.C.
The Socony-Vacuum Oil Company, Inc. of New York-owned tanker SS Dixie Arrow burns off Diamond Shoals, N.C., after being torpedoed by U-71 on March 26, 1942. The loss of the Dixie Arrow and other American tankers spurred the Petroleum Industry War Council to advocate using the Civil Air Patrol for coastal patrol service. Source: Department of the Navy, National Archives
The Socony-Vacuum Oil Company, Inc. of New York-owned tanker SS Dixie Arrow burns off Diamond Shoals, N.C., after being torpedoed by U-71 on March 26, 1942. The loss of the Dixie Arrow and other American tankers spurred the Petroleum Industry War Council to advocate using the Civil Air Patrol for coastal patrol service. Source: Department of the Navy, National Archives
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