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Louisiana Wing

Approach to missions is thorough, technologically driven

From hurricanes Betsy and Camille in the 1960s to Katrina and Isaac in the 2000s, the Louisiana Wing has been there to establish key ground radio network capabilities; transport key federal and state officials and equipment; conduct aerial surveillance of evacuation routes, levees and other affected areas; and demonstrate the value of airborne video and still photography.

In 1991, the wing worked one of the longest missions CAP volunteers have performed since World War II. Members logged more than 45 hours in nine aircraft when 34 of Louisiana’s 41 parishes were declared national disaster areas after a series of storms moved across the central U.S. Four years later, wing members showed their professionalism and skill when a mock exercise to test state and federal disaster response turned real. After 48 hours of rain caused flooding in south Louisiana, wing members were not only asked to conduct aerial surveillance and provide transportation, they also provided the state Emergency Operations Center with real-time intelligence through video from an aerial platform.

Wing members used the same skills after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, assisting the U.S. Coast Guard and providing air support for port security, photo documentation and daily alert aircraft for the Port Authority and Lake Charles Waterway.

First Army Lt. Gen. Russel Honoré briefs Civil Air Patrol Col. Rock Palermo (right) and others involved in the massive response to Hurricane Katrina. The disaster relief effort was officially called Joint Task Force Katrina; Honoré, now retired, served as commander. Palermo, then a member of the Louisiana Wing, led operations for some of the first CAP flights in New Orleans.
First Army Lt. Gen. Russel Honoré briefs Civil Air Patrol Col. Rock Palermo (right) and others involved in the massive response to Hurricane Katrina. The disaster relief effort was officially called Joint Task Force Katrina; Honoré, now retired, served as commander. Palermo, then a member of the Louisiana Wing, led operations for some of the first CAP flights in New Orleans.
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